Friday, 8 April 2011

UNIT 6 – MOVIESTORM PROJECT REPORT


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Thursday, 7 April 2011

Friday, 1 April 2011

SESSION 11 > 15: MOVIESTORM PRODUCTION ROLES


ROLE 1:
MOVIESTORM DESIGNER > CAMERA VIEW > CUTTING ROOM > PUBLISHER VIEW > EXPORT CLIPS


ROLE 2:
FINAL CUT EDITOR > FILM EDITOR + TITLES & CREDITS DESIGNER (USING PHOTOSHOP LAYERS)


ROLE 3:
SOUNDTRACK DESIGNER (USING GARAGEBAND) / FINDING SOUND EFFECTS / CREATING THE DIALOGUE CLIPS

Thursday, 31 March 2011

BLOG POST CHECK LIST

During each session you need to create a POST on your PERSONAL BLOG.
This will be printed out at the end of the project and become your PRODUCTION JOURNAL.

The BLOG POSTS should be a complete record of your progress producing the MOVIESTORM SHORT FILM UNIT.

The posts should include SCREEN GRABS, PHOTOS (Digital Camera & Photo Booth) and some INTERNET CONTENT linked to areas of your project RESEARCH.


PRE-PRODUCTION
SESSSION 1: Initial ideas
SESSSION 2: Roles
SESSSION 3: Moodboard
SESSSION 4: Proposal
SESSSION 5/6: 9 key frames
SESSSION 7/8: Storyboards
SESSSION 9: Shotlists
SESSSION 10: Production Schedule

PRODUCTION
SESSSION 11 > 19: Moviestorm short film production

DEADLINE (THURSDAY 9 am - 6th April)
SESSSION 20: Screening & feedback

Wednesday, 30 March 2011

Tuesday, 29 March 2011

SESSION 8 & 9: MOVIESTORM SESSION PRE-PRODUCTION


Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.

MOVIESTORM SESSION 8 & 9: STORYBOARDS & SHOTLISTS



1. PRODUCE STORYBOARDS FOR THE MOVIESTORM SHORT FILM


2. PRODUCE SHOTLISTS FOR THE MOVIESTORM SHORT FILM

Monday, 28 March 2011

PHOTOGRAPY UNIT SESSION - CRIME SCENE


For the CRIME SCENE PROJECT the UNIT BRIEF says that there MUST be evidence that your photographs have "combined images from different sources".

This can be done in a number of ways, here are a few suggestions:

1. Add props to your photograph e.g. guns, knives, police tape etc.
2. Add a different background
3. Add textures to your photograph e.g. scratches, tears etc.
4. Add a frame to your photograph. Search the internet for Photoshop frames.
(Here is a set that I have found: http://www.photoradar.com/techniques/technique/50-free-photo-frames-and-borders-for-photoshop )

Friday, 25 March 2011

SESSION 6 & 7: PRE-PRODUCTION: THE 9 KEY FRAME GRID PART 1





SESSION TASK: THE 9 KEY FRAME GRID (PART 1)

In your groups, create 9 KEY FRAMES for your short film.

- Each KEY FRAME should be drawn on a POST-IT.

- Stick the 9 POST-ITS on the A3 GRID SHEET.

- The key frames DO NOT have to be in a sequential order.


- Divide the task of drawing out the key frames between all members of the group.
i.e. do not have just one person do all the drawing!




The ART OF THE TITLE website uses the 9 key frame grid to show the visual style of a film opening.

Thursday, 24 March 2011

SESSION 4 & 5: PROJECT PROPOSAL


CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Each group must fill out the PROPOSAL FORM and email it to print.

The sections are:

1. WORKING TITLE
What is your short film going to be called?

2. PROPOSAL / TREATMENT
- Summarises the key events
- Conveys a clear sense of the proposed storyline
- A WHO, WHAT, WHEN & WHERE of the story
- Written in the present tense
- No dialogue
- Try to write about three paragraphs

3. TARGET AUDIENCE
Who will watch your film?
Who will the film be aimed at?

4. ROLES
List who is doing what.
Pre-production: Production Designer (settings/locations), Character Designer and Screenplay Writer
Film Production: Director, Camera Operator (creating the shots), Editor, Sound Designer and Title Sequence / Credits Designer

5. EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
Laptop
Microphone
Headphones
Headphones splitters

+ Software:
Moviestorm
Final Cut
Photoshop
Garageband

Wednesday, 23 March 2011

UNIT 6: AO1 - TWO MOVING IMAGE PRODUCTS ANALYSIS GRID & WRITE-UP


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

TWO MOVING IMAGE PRODUCT COMPARISON WRITE-UP
(Word Document – Write in full paragraphs using media terminology and illustrate with images)

For Assessment Objective 1 you need to write a comparison of two professional moving image products. These products should be chosen from either fictional or factual genres. You may access information about these products from Internet websites or film DVDs. However you MUST summarise and evaluate this information in your own words. Downloads of information from the Internet are not acceptable as evidence.


Essay Plan

Paragraph 1: Introduction
(Introduce your two moving image products)

Paragraph 2: Purpose
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 3: Target Audiences
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 4: Narrative Structure
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 5: Content & Elements
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 6: Production Team & Resourses
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 7: Strengths & Weaknesses
(Compare and analyse your two moving image products)

Paragraph 8: Summary

Tuesday, 22 March 2011

SESSION 2 & 3: PRE-PRODUCTION ROLES & PLANNING


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

PRE-PRODUCTION ROLES

1. CHARACTER DESIGNER
Create WORD character sheets for all characters

2. PRODUCTION DESIGNER - SETTINGS / LOCATIONS
Create WORD settings/locations sheets for all settings/locations

3. SCREENPLAY WRITER

Use the SCREENPLAY TEMPLATE in PAGES

EMAIL ME TO PRINT

Friday, 18 March 2011

SESSION 1: MOVIESTORM SHORT FILM - PRODUCTION ROLES


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

SESSION 1: PRODUCTION REPORTS AND FORMING GROUPS


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

ALL GROUPS MUST FILL OUT A PRODUCTION REPORT FOR EACH SESSION

Thursday, 17 March 2011

Wednesday, 16 March 2011

MOVIESTORM WORKSHOP WRITE-UP


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

DEADLINE: MONDAY

Tuesday, 15 March 2011

MOVIESTORM SESSION VIDEOS






CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEOS

1. KRISTIE
2. JACK
3. CRAIG
4. EDWARD
5. ASHLEIGH
6. TOM
7. JAMIE
8. LEWIS
9. BEN
10. LEE


Moviestorm in Education - Long Road 6th Form College


Here's Amos's very positve article posted on the Moviestorm Development blog yesterday about the excellent Moviestorm workshop run last Friday by with Alex....

At the end of last week, Alex and I had the pleasure of going into Long Road Sixth Form College, Cambridge to show some of the L2 students how to use Moviestorm for an upcoming project that they have to complete as part of their Media Studies course.


As we had the opportunity to spend most of the day with the class, Alex introduced the students to the Set Workshop view in the first session and then we answered a few questions while they practised making their own sets within Moviestorm. We had just enough time to demonstrate the Dressing Room and Directors View before lunch, and finished the day with the Camera Workshop View and Cutting Room. The students picked up the software very quickly and were able to start assembling scenes in a very short time (despite a couple of hardware issues that we have brought back to the dev team to find solutions for), and seemed comfortable finding solutions to their problems between them when they got stuck. Seeing their progress was a testament to their computer skills, and also reinforced our beliefs that most people can get a project up and running in Moviestorm within a day, even if they are new to the software.

We'd like to thank Steven Thorne at Long Road Sixth Form College for allowing us to come in and demonstrate Moviestorm, and to the students for being so receptive. We look forward to returning and seeing your movies in a few weeks' time!

Friday, 11 March 2011

MOVIESTORM SESSION


THIS SESSION WILL NOW RUN AT 10.50 AM, ON FRIDAY 11th MARCH.

Moviestorm enables you to create animated movies, using machinima technology. It takes the you from initial concept to finished, distributed movies.

Sets and characters can be created and customised, and scenes can be filmed using multiple cameras.


Thursday, 10 March 2011

CONTACT SHEETS


Contact sheets are ideal for laying out your images on a page and allow you to view them side by side in order to make comparisons.

Contact prints were originally created in the darkroom by placing negatives on top of developing paper then exposing them to light from the enlarger above. The photographer could then view individual thumbnails of each image and decide which ones to go ahead and print.



CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Create CONTACT SHEETS of all your photographs
Upload the contact sheets to FLICKR

In Photoshop MAIN MENU > FILE > AUTOMATE > CONTACT SHEET II


CLICK HERE for a demonstration video I found on the internet.

Thursday, 3 March 2011

PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 3: Henri Cartier-Bresson

video
Henri Cartier-Bresson
PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 3


Henri Cartier-Bresson will be your third and final PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY

1. Write a short biography about the photographer.
(early life/career etc.)

2. Describe the visual style of Henri Cartier-Bresson.

3. Then choose THREE Photographs produced by Henri Cartier-Bresson.
- add the photograph (it needs to be a large image).
- add the details (title, date, size & materials) of the photograph.
- write a short analysis of the photograph.

YOU MUST WRITE DOWN ALL YOUR SOURCES
Make a list of all the URLs you used with the research.
video

Friday, 18 February 2011

PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 2


PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 2

Choose between Jane Bown or Arnold Newman for your second PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY
- Use the links in the previous blog posts to start your research.


1. Write a short biography about the photographer
(colleges/career etc.)

2. Describe the visual style of the photographer.

3. Then choose THREE Photographs produced by the photographer.
- add the photograph (it needs to be a large image).
- add the details (title, date, size & materials) of the photograph.
- write a short analysis of the photograph.

YOU MUST WRITE DOWN ALL YOUR SOURCES
Make a list of all the URLs you used with the research.

Portrait Photography Techniques

video

Thursday, 17 February 2011

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY: Arnold Newman


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

CLICK HERE - Arnold Newman - THE PORTRAITS

The complete Jane Bown: a lifetime in photographs



The Observer published its first Jane Bown photograph in December 1949, initiating a romance between Britain's oldest Sunday paper and one of the country's best-loved photographers.

To coincide with the publication of Bown's definitive collection, Exposures, The Observer brought together all of Bown's work into this interactive guide.

Click HERE to scroll through, decade by decade, and view the images in full-screen format.

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY: Jane Bown

THE EXPOSURE TRIANGLE


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Tuesday, 15 February 2011

Ovation TV | Close Up: Gregory Crewdson

Narrative Photography/PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 1



1. Explain what is narrative photography

2. Write a short paragraph about the early history of 'staged' photography.
(see keynote)

----------------------------------------------------
PHOTOGRAPHER CASE STUDY 1

from the list below choose ONE photographer:

JEFF WALL
(Link 1 / Link 2)
GREGORY CREWDSON (Link 1 / Link 2)
CINDY SHERMAN
(Link 1 / Link 2)
SANDY SKOGLUND (Link 1 / Link 2)

1. Write a short biography about the photographer
(colleges/career etc.)

2. Describe the visual style of the photographer.

3. Then choose THREE Photographs produced by the photographer.
- add the photograph (it needs to be a large image).
- add the details (title, date, size & materials) of the photograph.
- write a short analysis of the photograph.

YOU MUST WRITE DOWN ALL YOUR SOURCES
Make a list of all the URLs you used with the research.

Narrative Photography

video

Photographs that tell a story.

How do you create a narrative within a photograph?

- use of characters
- use of props / objects / symbols
- use of lighting
- use of settings
- use of framing

Signifier + a sign that conveys meaning to the viewer.

Friday, 11 February 2011

Wednesday, 9 February 2011

UNIT 3 - ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVE 4: PRODUCTION REPORT


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Write a review of the production process and end sequence.

(Word Document – Write in full paragraphs using technical terms and illustrate your report with images and screen-grabs)

Thursday, 3 February 2011

THE FILM CREW


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Wednesday, 2 February 2011

END SEQUENCE PRODUCTION TIMELINE



CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Sunday, 30 January 2011

The ‘Snatch’ Effect Write-up



In WORD, using the ORANGE The ‘Snatch’ Effect A4 sheet, complete a written account of creating your end credits using the ‘Snatch’ effect.

Illustrate the process using screen grabs from your Final Cut timeline and Photoshop project.

Make sure you describe how to achieve the ‘Snatch’ effect in detail using the correct terminology.

Divide the write-up into the FOUR parts as described in the guide:

PART 1 – CREATING THE STILL
IMAGE IN FINAL CUT
PART 2 & 3 – PHOTOSHOP: EFFECTS & TEXT ON THE STILL IMAGE
PART 4 – CREATING THE EFFECT IN FINAL CUT

Friday, 28 January 2011

PROJECT OPENING TITLE


Your video production needs a title at the beginning of the project.

This TITLE should have the NAME of the production and 'End Sequence' on it.
It then needs to be added to the beginning of the project in the Final Cut Timeline.
The title needs to FADE UP & DOWN.

Thursday, 27 January 2011

The Credit Sequence / The ‘Snatch’ Effect

video

PART 1:

All groups will produce a 'Snatch' effect credits sequence for their end sequences using footage of their project's main characters.

PART 2:

Using the text generator in Final Cut all groups will then create closing credits of all the production roles:


Written by ……………

Production Design by ……………

Film Editing by ……………

Cinematography by ……………
Original Music by ……………

Directed by ……………

PART 3:
Lastly all groups will finish the credit sequence with:

A LONG ROAD MEDIA CERTIFICATE PRODUCTION 2011


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

The Credit Sequence / The ‘Snatch’ Effect - 2nd DEMO

video

Sunday, 23 January 2011

BLOG POST SESSION GRID - WEEK 2


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Friday, 21 January 2011

L2 WEEK 2: END SEQUENCE EDITING


Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Monday, 17 January 2011

BLOG POST SESSION GRID - WEEK 1


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Monday, 10 January 2011

FILM PRODUCTION PLANNiNG

IMPORTANT: Each group MUST fill out a BOOKING FORM to have use of college equipment for their production.



IMPORTANT: Each group MUST fill out a HEALTH & SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT GRID for each LOCATION of the production.



Filming Health & Safety 
Risk Assessment – Hazards Information Sheet



CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE

Friday, 7 January 2011

MEDIA PRODUCTION SESSION 1


Using the SCHEDULE GRID organise when you will be filming, uploading and editing.



As a group have your first PRODUCTION MEETING and record your decisions and planning using the MEETING MINUTES sheets.

UNIT 3 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA PRODUCTION



For the next FOUR weeks you will be producing the 2 minute action-thriller end sequences you planned in UNIT 2.

The first week will be planning & filming leaving the second week for the editing of the project.

During this time each group will be expected to evidence the following:


1. Working title

2. Brief description of the product to be made

3. Roles assigned eg director, camera operator, editor etc.
4. Equipment booked eg video camera, still camera, tripod etc. [BOOKING FORMS]
5. Materials ordered eg props etc. [RECEIPTS]

6. Locations eg studio, office, outside location [RISK ASSESSMENT & RECCE]

7. Schedule activities [DATES & TIME]

8. Follow a production schedule & updating the schedule

9. Hold regular production meetings [MEETING MINUTES]

10. Consider relevant legal and ethical issues

11. Carry out a risk assessment or recce

12. Follow safe working practices